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Bariatric Program

Qualifications for Bariatric Surgery

Bariatric surgery, or weight-loss surgery, provides a long-lasting weight-loss solution for obese patients. The surgery, whether it would be a gastric bypass or gastric sleeve, makes changes to the stomach and digestive system that limits the amount of food that can be eaten and how many nutrients can be absorbed.

Despite being a recommended surgery for obese patients, many criteria must be met in order to become a candidate. Generally, most patients will qualify for bariatric surgery if they’re at least 100 pounds over their ideal body weight or if their BMI is 35 or 35 to 39.9, with two or more comorbidities.

Use our calculator to find out your patient's BMI:

Temple Health BMI Calculator

Choose your units US       International


pounds

feet inches


kg

cm


Enter your height and weight above to
calculate your Body Mass Index.

Your BMI is  

Your BMI category is:  

 

BMI categories are as follows:

Underweight = Less than 18
Healthy weight = 18–24.9
Overweight = 25–29.9
Obese = 30–34.9
Severely obese = 35–39.9
Morbidly obese = 40 and over

Qualifying Criteria for Bariatric Surgery

Your patient may be a candidate for bariatric surgery if they meet the following criteria:

  • BMI of 35 to 39.9, with two or more comorbidities, such as diabetes, hypertension, sleep apnea or heart disease
  • BMI of 40 or more, with or without comorbidities
  • Proven inability to lose weight in the past
  • Obesity-related conditions that could be life-threating if untreated
  • No medical conditions that may put a patient at risk during and after surgery
  • Psychological preparation, as depression after surgery is a serious risk
  • Motivation to work after surgery to lose the weight
  • Age requirements, if applicable

Refer a patient to the Temple Bariatric Program >


 

Page medically reviewed by:
Eric J. Velazquez, MD, FACS, FASMBS
November 25, 2019