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 604 items in 61 pages

Temple Lung Center Director Reports
Continued Positive Results for Study Examining
Minimally Invasive Treatment of Severe Emphysema


(Philadelphia, PA) – Dr. Gerard Criner, MD, FACP, FACCP, Chair and Professor of Thoracic Medicine and Surgery at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University, announced the 12-month results of the EMPROVE multicenter, randomized and controlled study for the Spiration® Valve System (SVS), a minimally invasive treatment for severe emphysema, at the European Respiratory Society International Congress (ERS) in Paris, France, on Sept. 18.
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Dr. Cecelia Schmalbach Appointed The Inaugural David Myers, MD Professor and Chair in Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University


(Philadelphia, PA) – Cecelia E. Schmalbach, MD, MSc, FACS, has been appointed The David Myers, MD Professor and Chair in Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University, effective October 1, 2018. This newly-endowed Chair honoring Dr. David Myers, a former Chair of Temple Otorhinology, will support in perpetuity the department’s excellence and innovation in clinical care, research, and medical training.
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Temple Scientists Identify Genetic Variants Almost Exclusive to African Americans That Predict Poor Outcomes in Dilated Cardiomyopathy Heart Disease


(Philadelphia, PA) – Genetic testing is a powerful diagnostic tool that is increasingly being used for the diagnosis of dilated cardiomyopathy, a disease in which the heart becomes enlarged, making it difficult to pump blood. Cardiomyopathy affects more than 3.5 million people in the United States. African Americans are at especially high risk but have been underrepresented in genetic studies, often due to socioeconomic barriers and other health disparities. Now, after years of work, researchers at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University have identified four variations in a gene known as BAG3 that are linked to a poor outcome.
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Temple University Hospital Performs Nation’s First
Post-FDA Approval Bronchoscopic Lung Volume
Reduction Using Implantation of the Zephyr®
Endobronchial Valve to Treat Severe Emphysema


(Philadelphia, PA) – Temple University Hospital has become the first U.S. center to perform bronchoscopic lung volume reduction using implantation of the Zephyr® Endobronchial Valve (Zephyr® EBV®) to treat severe emphysema following U.S. FDA approval.
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Dr. Thomas Fekete Appointed Chair of Medicine
at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University


(Philadelphia, PA) – Thomas Fekete, MD, has been appointed Chair of Medicine at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University. Dr. Fekete has served as Interim Chair of Medicine since November 2017.
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Temple-Led Research Calls into Question the Effectiveness
of Inferior Vena Cava Filter Use in Patients Undergoing
Catheter-Directed Thrombolysis for Deep Vein Thrombosis


(Philadelphia, PA) – Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a common medical condition in which blood clots develop in the deep veins of the body, often in the legs, thigh or pelvis. These clots can break loose and travel to the lungs and can cause a life-threatening pulmonary embolism. Proximal DVT, which refers to a clot in the thigh or pelvis, has been shown to be associated with a higher risk for post-thrombotic syndrome, a painful condition characterized by swelling, redness and sores on the legs.
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Temple University Hospital Offering First FDA-Approved
Minimally Invasive Bronchoscopic Treatment for Emphysema


(Philadelphia, PA) – Last month, a Temple University Hospital-led research team reported that implantation of the Zephyr® Endobronchial Valve (Zephyr® EBV®) successfully reduced shortness of breath and improved lung function and quality of life, with benefits lasting at least one-year post-intervention for patients with severe emphysema. The results of that clinical trial, known as LIBERATE, were presented at the ATS International Conference and published simultaneously in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. Having completed a review of the study results, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has today granted pre-market approval under its breakthrough devices designation to the Zephyr® EBV® to treat breathing difficulty associated with severe emphysema.
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New Research Provides Expanded Insights into the Brain’s Response to Opioids and the Search for a New Class of Painkillers with Fewer Side Effects


(Philadelphia, PA) – Opioids are powerful painkillers that act on the brain, but they have a range of harmful side effects including addiction. Researchers from the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry in collaboration with researchers from the Medical University of Innsbruck, Austria, University of Innsbruck, and the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University, have developed a tool that gives deeper insights into the brain’s response to opioids.
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Temple Scientists Eradicate Cancer Cells Through
Dual Targeting of DNA Repair Mechanisms


(Philadelphia, PA) – Proteins commonly known as BRCA – short for BReast CAncer susceptibility gene– serve a critical role in cellular DNA repair, but when mutated they allow genetic errors to replicate, facilitating cancer development. If the BRCA repair system is disabled in cancer cells, the cells simply turn to backup repair mechanisms and adapt to alternative repair pathways, a survival mode that also underlies their ability to evade targeted drug therapies. Now, new research by scientists at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University shows that it is possible to eliminate at least two backup repair mechanisms at the same time using two targeted therapies.
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Temple Researchers Successfully Reverse
Cognitive Impairments in Mice with Dementia


(Philadelphia, PA) – Reversing memory deficits and impairments in spatial learning is a major goal in the field of dementia research. A lack of knowledge about cellular pathways critical to the development of dementia, however, has stood in the way of significant clinical advance. But now, researchers at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University (LKSOM) are breaking through that barrier. They show, for the first time in an animal model, that tau pathology – the second-most important lesion in the brain in patients with Alzheimer's disease – can be reversed by a drug.
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